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**BREAST SCREENING PROGRAMME - the NHS Breast screening programme will be sending out invites from the end of September 2019 to female patients aged 50-70 years old.  It is IMPORTANT that you attend this screening as it can save lives from breast cancer.  The screening can find breast cancers at an early stage when they are too small to see of feel.  For more information go to the Further Information box at the bottom right hand side of this screen and click on Breast Screening Programme 2019.**

Brexit & NHS

Information for patients

There is information for patients on NHS.uk/brexit-medicine (this link will open in a new window - popups must be allowed)



    1. Medicines



You don’t need to take any special action to keep getting your medicines and medical products after Brexit.

The NHS, the Department of Health and Social Care and medical companies are prepared for Brexit. Plans are in place to help ensure you keep getting your medicines and medical products. What you should do:

Your medicines and prescriptions



    • If you or someone you care for regularly take medication you should keep ordering your prescriptions in the usual way and take your medicines as normal.

    • If you are concerned about treatment, please speak to your pharmacist, GP or specialist.



 

Clinical trials



    • Clinical trials are expected to continue as normal in the coming months.

    • If you are concerned about a clinical trial you or a family member are taking part in, please speak with the NHS organisation that is hosting the trial.



 

What we’re doing:

The plans developed by the NHS and Department of Health and Social Care cover all medicines and medical products. This includes:



    • all prescribed medicines

    • over the counter medicines (medicines you can buy without a prescription)

    • medical devices eg surgical instruments, gloves and gowns

    • nutritional products

    • bloods, blood and transplant products (there are some medicines that are derived from blood plasma such as immunoglobulin, albumin, and clotting factors)

    • vaccines



 

These plans cover the entire United Kingdom, Isle of Man & The Channel Islands.

 

We’ve asked GPs and pharmacists to continue to prescribe medicines and medical products as usual and avoid issuing longer than normal prescriptions.

Extra supplies already in the UK

Companies supplying the UK with medicines and medical products already have additional stocks in the UK in preparation for Brexit.

The Department of Health and Social Care has secured more warehouse space to keep the extra medicines in.

Transport to keep medical deliveries coming into the UK

The government now has contracts with transport services to keep the flow of medicines and medical products coming in to the UK.

This includes aeroplane courier services to get medicines into the UK within 24 hours if needed, as well as priority space on other routes such as ferries.

Other information related to healthcare and Brexit

If you are a healthcare professional, see NHS England’s guidance for healthcare professionals - Frequently asked questions about patients’ access to medicines after Brexit



    1. Medical devices and clinical consumables (MDCC)




    • It is important that patients only order their medical devices as normal and continue to use them as normal.

    • If you are concerned, please speak to your doctor or pharmacist.



 



    1. Non clinical consumables, goods and services




    • National and local measures are in place to help ensure that the non-clinical goods and services, including food for hospitals, that the NHS needs to function continue to be available.



 



    1. Workforce




    • Measures have been put in place to help the NHS to maintain staff levels following EU Exit.

    • Under UK legislation, the qualifications of EU staff will continue to be recognised in the UK.



 



 
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